Project Ideas

2014-2015


Real-Time Reactive Jamming with Reconfigurable Antennas

  • Project Description
    Antennas whose operating characteristics can be changed electronically.
    Switches connecting conductive elements can alter the current density distributions resulting in changes in pattern, polarization, and/or frequency.
    Reconfigurable antennas provide multiple uncorrelated channels for a single link
    Reconfigurable antenna freedom can be used for:  Throughput maximization, Interference alignment / mitigation, Security
    Information Warfare.
  • Contact
    Dr. Kapil Dandekar
    dandekar@coe.drexel.edu
    Drexel Wireless Systems Lab
    http://wireless.ece.drexel.edu/


Bellyband for Pregnancy Monitoring or SIDS Detection

  • Project Description
    Conductive threads integrated into clothing can be used to realize knitted electronics.
    Bellyband for pregnant mother and fetal monitoring.
    Collaboration between College of Engineering, College of Media Arts and Design, and College of Medicine.
  • Contact
    Dr. Kapil Dandekar
    dandekar@coe.drexel.edu
    Drexel Wireless Systems Lab
    http://wireless.ece.drexel.edu/


Control system for multi-faceted visual display

  • Project Description
    Development of a control system which can move and rotate individual video displays as part of a larger composite visual display.
  • Contact
    Dr. Youngmoo Kim
    ykim@drexel.edu
    MET LAB
    http://music.ece.drexel.edu/



2013-2014

Android-Controlled Quadcopter for Power Plant Use

  • Project Description
    The project entails developing a product that can be used for multiple problems that face both conventional and nuclear power plants. A quadcopter will be controlled using the NVIDIA Shield (see shield.nvidia.com). The camera on the quadcopter will send images back to the Shield and provide live time video on the screen. Additionally, a Geiger counter will be attached to the quadcopter, and information will be displayed on the screen of the Shield. The overall goal is to provide a remote sensor suit that can be used to monitor accidental release of radiation to the atmosphere, as well as remote visual inspection and the detection of steam leaks.
  • Team Composition:
    This project already has three highly motivated students. We are interested in one or two ECE students well-versed in Java/Android programming to help complete the team.
  • Contact:
    Dr. Christopher Peters
    cpeters@coe.drexel.edu


The Drexel Ride

  • Project Description
    The Motion Platform’s mechanical and electrical requirements/specs are unresearched and undeveloped. These need to be reverse engineered to expose the limitations and potential of the systems. This will lead to new interfaces and control schemes for ride passengers and operators.
    Documentation of the mechanical workings from the hydraulic lines to the pneumatic controls is one major deliverable. Implementation of new hardware to replace old proprietary hardware based on previous documentation. Creation of interface for easily swappable control schemes.
  • Team Composition:
    Mechanical, Computer, and Electrical engineer skills are vital to the project. An interdisciplinary team could focus on a wide breadth of research or a more focused team could focus on a narrow slice of the platform. A familiarization with programming, specifically network programming, is useful.
  • Funding:
    $500 (another $500 needed)
  • Contact:
    Dr. Paul Diefenbach
    pjdief@drexel.edu


Silver Rabbit Pacing Light System for Distance Train

  • Project Description
    To manufacture and market a reliable training product to accomplish learning through multiple sensory modalities simultaneously (sight/sound and physical experience) will likely hasten the desired training outcome.
    Individual, portable light boxes (likely 15-20) that would be evenly spaced around the inside of the track essentially providing a visual/lighted pace on the track to chase. These would be coordinated or programmed to light sequentially at any given timing/pace to provide the desired pace for the lap. These lights would be designed coordinate their lighting sequentially to any given pace or time for completion of the entire lap in any allotted amount of time (i.e 50 seconds, 60 seconds, 70 seconds, etc) thereby reproducing a smooth continuous light bar projected onto the track for the runners to actually see and pace themselves against while also hearing the given time announced via and audio component (say every 5 seconds from a central speaker system).
    This opportunity to train by pacing more precisely is clearly more reliable than merely chasing an experienced runner. The reliably reproducible experience of consistent and accurate pacing is, therefore, likely easier to “learn”. Having and using the visual demonstration of the lighting along with the simultaneous hearing of the times called/projected out while actually feeling yourself running will enhance development of the runners performance.
    The necessary programming/computerization technology to provide synchronization of the lights –with the sequential lighting of the 15-20 spaced strobe lights already exist in many forms and applications (i.e. bill-boards and outdoor lighting displays and advertisements). Similarly, the possibility of designing a central control panel and/or software component to dial up or down a given pace desired for the lighting or the capacity to design/program sequential lap speeds of varying paces should be readily accomplished with some simple computer programming. The training flexibility and utility are abundant with potential for training 100 to 1600 meter runners and beyond.
  • Contact:
    Dr. Milt Silver (Biaida Institute)
    Phone: 215-895-2150
    Mary Waechter (Sport Management)
    Phone: 215.895.5967
    Email: mwaechter@drexel.edu


CVP Relief System for Heart Failure Patients

  • Project Description
    Symptomatic heart failure (HF) accounts for nearly 1,000,000 yearly hospital admissions and there are an estimated 35,000 children and 5.7 million adults in the United States living with heart failure with an estimated annual cost to the health care system of $35 billion. Many of the symptoms of heart failure are a result of failure of the lymphatic system due to an elevated central venous pressure (CVP), which eventually leads to symptoms such as pulmonary edema, lower extremity edema, and ascites.One of the main functions of the lymphatic system is to transport excess interstitial fluid and proteins back into the venous system. In patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) or liver dysfunction an elevated CVP overloads the lymphatic system by several pathophysiological mechanisms. First, an increase in hydrostatic pressure in tissues leads to a shift in the balance of Starling forces favoring interstitial fluid formation. As a result there is an increase in lymphatic production in soft tissues and especially in the liver (from 2-3 l/day up to 20-30 l/day). Second, increased CVP has been shown to result in decreased thoracic duct (TD) drainage due to a high pressure in the innominate vein. Last, it has also been suggested that there is a limited flow capacity of the TD outlet valve. To improve the symptoms of heart failure researchers and clinicians have devised different schemes to increase lymphatic drainage (surgical lymphovenous connection) to see if this resolves the symptoms of lymphatic congestion in both patients and animal models. In an animal model of right heart failure with severely elevated CVP, connecting the TD to the lower pressure pulmonary veins has resulted in resolution of ascites and fall in TD pressure. In patients with severe CHF external drainage of the TD to atmospheric pressure has resulted in near complete resolution of heart failure symptoms, such as edema. Similar observations were seen with surgical lymphovenous connections in experimental ascites due to IVC constriction and in patients with liver cirrhosis.Lymphovenous connections work well when the TD can be connected to a low-pressure system. In patients with elevated CVP due to heart failure no such system exists because the entire venous system is at high pressure. External drainage of the TD to atmospheric pressure, which has been shown to work in patients, cannot be done on a chronic basis because it results in metabolic and hemodynamic derangements due to drainage of metabolites and the lymphatic fluid. Alternatively, internal decompression of the TD, where the lymphatic fluid is drained into a low-pressure system and then pumped back into the circulatory system is possible and has the potential to serve as a new chronic therapy for patients with symptomatic heart failure. It is the main aim of our research to design a self contained implantable lymphatic decompression prototype devise and determine the feasibility of using this device for long term decompression of the lymphatic system in an animal model of heart failure or liver failure. Ultimately, our goal is to implement this approach in people as a new therapy for symptomatic heart or liver failure.
  • Team Composition
    ECE, MEM, BIOMED
  • Contact
    Dr. Allon Guez
    guezal@drexel.edu


Advanced Safety Sensor

  • Project Description
    Identify technologies to develop a non-contact, wireless, battery-less safety sensor for the industrial door and gate market. The sensor will protect humans and materials from harm or damage caused by a moving automatic door or gate system. A low cost, easy to install, functional proto-type with a wireless range of up to 50 feet and the ability to protect between 3 feet and 30 feet of door/gate openings. Safety sensor will be used indoors and outdoors. Safety Risks and effectiveness associated with identified technology should be considered.
  • Team Composition
    ECE, MEM, Materials
  • Funding
    Funding available for materials.
  • Contact
    Dr. Bruce A. Eisenstein
    College of Engineering, Office of the Dean
    215-895-2359
    eisens@coe.drexel.edu


Naval Air Systems Command Capstone Projects

  • Project Description
    NAVAIR has released a comprehensive list of projects which they will be sponsoring for the upcoming year. The topics coverage wide range of disciplines within ECE and are open to all students.  The complete list of projects can be found here.
  • Contact
    Dr. Leonid Hrebien
    lhrebien@coe.drexel.edu


Story-driven Multiplayer Augmented Reality Adventure Game

  • Project Description
    Collaborate with a  creative team of writers, artists and designers to create a new entertainment experience that is 1 part role playing game, 1 part social network and 1 part alternate reality adventure story.
  • Contact
    Aaron Bilenky
    ab574@drexel.edu


Redesign of Optical Components

  • Project Description
    The project is to consist of the drafting and manufacturing of several commercially available catalog parts. The finished pieces must consist only of 3D printed and off-the-shelf components with no machining or manual tooling except tapping threads. Multiple versions of the finished pieces are allowed with justification of changes. The complete deliverable package can be completed for only one version as long as the reason for abandoning such efforts for other versions is documented.
    The deliverables for the project are:
    – The finished goods
    – Dimensional accuracy of design –vs- finished goods
    – The hardware list and 3d models of the finished goods
    – A table of total costs with comparison to existing commercially available equivalents
    – An estimate of useable lifetime and comparison with commercial equipment of cost per 1000 cycles
    – Documentation of the build times and volumes
    – A functional test comparison with incumbent catalog parts per test criteria below
    Intact and working units of all final designs must be presented for hands-on evaluation of usability and perceived build quality. The hands on evaluation and deliverable package are to be presented on site at Edmund Optics, Barrington, NJ.
  • Team Composition:
    Two MEM, One ECE.
  • Faculty Advisor:
    Dr. Timothy Kurzweg
  • Contact:
    Dr. Timothy Kurzweg
    kurzweg@coe.drexel.edu


Detecting Opioids in the Human Eye via Image Processing

  • Project Description:
    The goal would be to take inputs from a camera, perform image processing on the data and produce a relative change in position of the human eye (pupil, oscillation of the eye and perhaps any other differences we can detect) while stimulated by opioids. The goal would be to determine a relative dosage level of patients, specifically children. The project has clinical support as well and she needs a senior design team to build the device, perform the analysis and create the program. Some of the equipment has already been bought.
  • Team Composition:
    Two BIOMED, One or Two ECE.
  • Faculty Advisor:
    Dr. Meltem Izzetoglu
  • Contact:
    Chris Vaele
    cwv23@drexel.edu


Recording Ammeter for Remote Deployment, Year 2

  • Project Description
    Electric utilities have a need for a recording instrument to capture high-current timeseries data from cables in areas of high environmental stress (humidity, submersion, temperature, etc.). The self-powered instrument must endure these environments for periods of up to several weeks, at which point the device is removed and the data
    downloaded for study. A sophisticated device and a set of supporting software was created by a 2012-13 senior design group, but the unit has some errors in the PCB implementation, and while it performed well in the lab it failed when used in a manhole. This year’s group must learn how the existing device operates on both the software and
    hardware sides, correct and improve the system design, and investigate and correct the device’s apparent sensitivity to electro-magnetic interference.
  • Team Composition
    A mix of students from EE and CE.
    Skill Sets: Computer programming, microcontrolers, implementation of Excel plug-ins, analog and mixed-signal system design, electrical system and software debugging techniques, circuit simulation, printed circuit board design and assembly, electric power, adaptability, teamwork, communications.
  • Funding
    No funding is currently available.
  • Contact
    Kevin Scoles, scoleskj@drexel.edu, Bossone 413C
    Groups or individuals should provide resumes in person or by email. The resume should emphasize your relevant practical experiences and skill sets rather than GPA or courses taken.


Electric Vehicle Drive Train Modeling

  • Project Description
    Model the energy use of electric vehicles, beginning with the 2013-14 Drexel Formula Hybrid car, with the goal of optimizing car drive train hardware and driving strategies.
    Modeling will make use of AVL Cruise software. The Formula Hybrid model can use last year’s results as a starting point, and move into implementation of regenerative braking
    and track banking. Additional vehicles may be addressed. Model the energy use of electric vehicles, beginning with the 2013-14 Drexel Formula Hybrid car, with the goal of optimizing car drive train hardware and driving strategies. Modeling will make use of AVL Cruise software. The Formula Hybrid model can use last year’s results as a starting point, and move into implementation of regenerative braking and track banking. Additional vehicles may be addressed.
  • Team Composition
    A mix of students from ECE and MEM.
    Skill sets: Computer programming (MATLAB/SimuLink experience preferred), familiarity with electric motors, automotive drive trains, energy storage systems (batteries, etc.), adaptability, teamwork, communications.
  • Funding
    The AVL Cruise software is available under a university license. No further funding is available.
  • Contact
    Kevin Scoles, scoleskj@drexel.edu, Bossone 413C
    Groups or individuals should provide resumes in person or by email. The resume should emphasize your relevant practical experiences and skill sets rather than GPA or courses taken.


Smart Cup to Measure and Monitor Liquid Intake

  • Project Description
    The objective of this senior design project is to develop a second-generation prototype of a device that wirelessly records the amount and type of fluid consumed during a drinking event. Data generated from each drinking event will be processed such that real-time tracking of liquid intake is available to the enduser. This project is part of an ongoing collaboration between the College of Nursing and Health Professions (R. DiMaria-Ghalili, PhD, RN) and School of Biomedical Engineering (K. Pourrezaei, PhD).
  • Team Composition
    The team will consist of three students: 2 ECE (preferably one with strong coding skills), 1ME.
  • Funding
    Funding is available for materials for the project.
  • Contact
    COE Faculty Facilitator: B. Nabet, PhD (nabet@ece.drexel.edu)
    Project contact: R. DiMaria-Ghalili, PhD (rad83@drexel.edu)
    Candidates may send an email to rad83@drexel.edu. Please include a resume with pertinent work experience and skills.


Flexinol Control System

  • Project Description
    Flexinol is a metal wire which expandsub1s and contracts relative to the current passing through it.  This project will continue the efforts of a 2012-2013 team to create a control system for Flexinol.
  • Contact
    Dr. Pramod Abichandani
    pva23@drexel.edu
    Data Fusion Laboratory
    http://dfl.ece.drexel.edu/


Crowdsourcing Forensics

  • Project Description
    Crowdsourcing frameworks, such as Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, will be leveraged in an effort to conduct widescale testing of handwriting forensics.
  • Contact
    Dr. Pramod Abichandani
    pva23@drexel.edu
    Data Fusion Laboratory
    http://dfl.ece.drexel.edu/


UAVs for Concerts

  • Project Description
    Wireless communication and aviation control systems will be seamlessly intertwined to direct formation flying of Quad Copters for entertainment purposes.
  • Contact
    Dr. Pramod Abichandani
    pva23@drexel.edu
    Data Fusion Laboratory
    http://dfl.ece.drexel.edu/


Development of the 2014 Formula Hybrid Race Car

  • Project Description
    formulaSaeConcept formulaSaeCar1
    – Design and implement the electrical and mechanical aspects of the new electric drive train
    – Implement a CANbus communications network in the car
    – Battery charger, motor controller and battery management system all communicate over CANbus. You will integrate a National Instrument cRIO real-time processor into the network to provide monitoring and control of car functions, sensor operations, telemetry and driver interface. Programming will be done in the real-time version of LabVIEW.
    – Design and implement the high and low voltage electronics in the car, including the battery box mechanical and electrical design
    – Design and implement new mechanical systems behind the roll bar to support the drive train, provide suspension and braking
    – Improve upon a legacy chassis design forward of the roll bar, decreasing weight, maintaining safety, and improving driving performance.
    – Read, interpret and implement all electrical and mechanical safety requirements in the 2014 rule set
  • Group Composition
    CANbus network: 2 CE, 1 EE
    High and low voltage systems: 2 EE, 1 MEM
    Rear chassis/suspension design: 2-3 MEM
    Front chassis/suspension design 2-3 MEM
    This a multi-disciplinary project and welcomes students with the needed skill sets from any COE department.
  • Funding
    Current funding will support design and some fabrication, but not a full race-ready car and race travel. Additional fundraising is in progress and will need student participation.
  • Contact
    ECE: Kevin Scoles, scoleskj@drexel.edu, Bossone 413C
    MEM: Tein-Min Tan, tan@drexel.edu, Curtis 155C
    Groups or individuals should provide resumes in person or by email. The resume should emphasize your relevant practical experiences and skill sets rather than GPA or courses taken.


Probee: Firefighter Safety System

  • Project Description
    Probee Safety is a program which will be used by fire officers to quickly identify trapped or injured fire fighters operating on an emergency scene. The reason I am pursuing this project is to try and prevent future fire fighter fatalities resulting from ineffective rescue efforts in situations which, in retrospect, could have easily been resolved in minutes with the technology I am proposing.
    I am interested in any electrical, computer, or mechanical engineers who will be able to share my enthusiasm for this cause. The project will entail the creation of hardware used by each individual fire fighter and an pseudo Ad Hoc network which will be established upon arrival to a fire scene. In addition, an Android application will be developed for use by the fire safety officer who is monitoring the fire fighters operating on the scene.
  • Group Composition
    Currently has 2 ECE members and is looking for 2 more ECE members.
  • Contact
    Dan Shirley
    das425@drexel.edu


Real-Time Reactive Jamming with Reconfigurable Antennas

  • Project Description
    Antennas whose operating characteristics can be changed electronically.
    Switches connecting conductive elements can alter the current density distributions resulting in changes in pattern, polarization, and/or frequency.
    Reconfigurable antennas provide multiple uncorrelated channels for a single link
    Reconfigurable antenna freedom can be used for:  Throughput maximization, Interference alignment / mitigation, Security
    Information Warfare.
  • Contact
    Dr. Kapil Dandekar
    dandekar@coe.drexel.edu
    Drexel Wireless Systems Lab
    http://wireless.ece.drexel.edu/


Bellyband for Pregnancy Monitoring or SIDS Detection

  • Project Description
    Conductive threads integrated into clothing can be used to realize knitted electronics.
    Bellyband for pregnant mother and fetal monitoring.
    Collaboration between College of Engineering, College of Media Arts and Design, and College of Medicine.
  • Contact
    Dr. Kapil Dandekar
    dandekar@coe.drexel.edu
    Drexel Wireless Systems Lab
    http://wireless.ece.drexel.edu/


Control system for multi-faceted visual display

  • Project Description
    Development of a control system which can move and rotate individual video displays as part of a larger composite visual display.
  • Contact
    Dr. Youngmoo Kim
    ykim@drexel.edu
    MET LAB
    http://music.ece.drexel.edu/


Pressure and infusion feedback mechanism for continuity of volume during ophthalmic microsurgery

  • Project Description
    Presently when performing intraocular surgery the volume of the eye is maintained by infusing fluid under gravity from a hanging bottle while material is removed from the eye as in the procedures of phacoemulsification or vitrectomy. This balance is at present visually achieved through observation by the surgeon. This is suboptimal because changes in pressure have a physical effect on the tissues of the eye and copious irrigation can wear away surface cells such as the corneal endothelium. In this study a micro-pressure transducer is adapted to monitor the intraocular pressure and to feedback with fluid infusion to alleviate some of the risk and dangers inherent with present-day ophthalmic micro-surgery.
    The senior design project will consist of building a prototype device that will be used to demonstrate this concept using a “simulated eye” (such as a small balloon filled with a jelly type substance). The students will utilize a real operating instrument as part of their project and make an external system to monitor and control the pressure. Success will be measured by demonstrating a plot of the pressure within some bounds during the time of a simulated operation
  • Team Composition
    One biomedical engineer,  Two ECE student with appropriate skills,  One MEM
  • Contact
    Dr. Chmielewski
    tchmiele@coe.drexel.deu
    Provide a terse list of you skills needed to accomplish the project and the skill set you have in table form (i.e. “C” programming in real time, abillty to make printed circuit boards, etc).


Implementation of an Expired Patent using Current technology

  • Project Description
    The objective is to find an expired patent (older than 17 years) which interests the group. The group will then implement the device/invention using current technology. The intent is three fold:  (1) to understand how to read and interpret a patent; (2) to prove that there is enough information in the published patent for “one skilled in the arts” to make an operational device; and (3) to utilize current technology to implement the device
  • Team Composition
    Depends on the project selected.
  • Contact
    Dr. Chmielewski
    tchmiele@coe.drexel.deu
    1. Provide a brief list of the patents you are interested in.
    2. Provide a terse list of you skills needed to accomplish the project and the skill set you have in table form (i.e. “C” programming in real time, abillty to make printed circuit boards, etc).


The Eye as a Sonic Cavity

  • Project Description
    The eye is an enclosed volume of in homogeneous material. If it is vibrated a standing wave should be created along its surface. If there is a discontinuity of the surface then this wave should have the characteristic change.
    When the eye is lacerated or punctured it should be a change in the standing wave. At times it is not always easy to determine if there is a puncture in the eye. The puncture may be quite small and not need surgical exploration since it may self seal at a small enough size. Similarly if the puncture is posterior may not be found other than surgical exploration. If it is overlooked in the diagnosis, the results are devastating.
    By resonating the eye with a transducer and using various methods to determine the status of the generated wave, it may be possible to answer these vital clinical problems.
    The senior design project will consist of building a prototype device that will be used to demonstrate this concept using a “simulated eye” (such as a small balloon filled with a jelly type substance). Success will be measured by finding a small pin prick in the simulated eye membrane using the device.
  • Team Composition
    One BIOMED engineer, Two ECE student with appropriate skills, One MEM
  • Contact
    Dr. Chmielewski
    tchmiele@coe.drexel.deu
    Provide a terse list of you skills needed to accomplish the project and the skill set you have in table form.


Automated epileptic seizure detection and scoring of human EEG using MatLab

  • Project Description
    The goal of this project is to design a series of MatLab scripts which allow for the automated detection of seizure activity in EEG data collected from patients with epilepsy at Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia. Currently, this process is done by visual inspection of data and it takes several days to go through a set of recordings. Using a graphic user interface, which is to be built as part of the project, the clinicians should be able to input the raw EEG files and run the scripts to identify moments of seizure activity. Building the scripts to identify seizure activity at an efficiency equivalent to visual inspection will be the focus of the project. The scripts will identify conditions in the EEG data that signify seizure activity (brain wave patterns) and output the location of the occurrence, allowing clinicians to determine where the seizure occurred. Knowing this information is useful for clinicians as it will give them a better idea of whether or not the patient can receive resection surgery, a process in which infected areas of the brain are removed in an attempt to alleviate seizures.  The project is multi-disciplinary, requiring students from the biomedical engineering department with experience in data analysis as well students from an ECE background who have knowledge of how to program.
  • Faculty Advisor
    Faculty advisor for this project is Dr. Karen Moxon, with additional supervision from Amrit Misra.
    Dr. Moxon may be reached at karen.moxon57@gmail.com.
    Amrit Misra may be reached at amrit.misra@gmail.com.
  • Group Composition
    The group will consist of four students. Two of these students (myself included) will be biomedical engineering students. Looking for 2 ECE students with proficiency in MatLab coding.
  • Funding
    The primary work requires no additional funds as MatLab is available through Drexel University and data is available from pre-existing collections.
  • Contact
    Candidates may send an email to jkc52@drexel.edu. Candidates should provide a resume with pertinent work experience so that I may accurately assess candidacy for the position.


Tactile Amplification Glove

  • Project Description
    This project entails the development and evaluation of a hand-worn device for measuring and amplifying touch sensations felt during manual interaction with objects or tissues. Applications are envisioned in biomedical sensing, resulting in a kind of “stethoscope for the hand.”
  • Team Composition
    The ideal team will comprise 2-4 students with skills in electronics, embedded systems, mechanical engineering, and/or software/computing.
  • Funding
    Funding may be available. Interested groups should contact Yon Visell by email.
  • Contact
    Yon Visell, PhD
    Assistant Professor
    yon.visell@drexel.edu
    RE TOUCH Lab
    www.re-touch-lab.com


Variable Friction Multitouch Screen

  • Project Description
    This project entails the design of a multitouch interactive tablet that allows its user to feel objects or interactions on the screen. It does so by dynamically varying the friction between a finger and the touched surface, by actuating the touch surface at ultrasonic frequencies. Applications to gaming or navigation are anticipated.
  • Team Composition
    The ideal team size is 2-4 students with skills in electronics, embedded systems, mechanical engineering and software/computing.
  • Funding
    Funding may be available. Interested groups should contact Yon Visell by email.
  • Contact
    Yon Visell, PhD
    Assistant Professor
    yon.visell@drexel.edu
    RE TOUCH Lab
    www.re-touch-lab.com


Haptic Exoskeleton for Movement Training

  • Project Description
    This project will involve the design of a lightweight actuated exoskeleton for movement training. The device is based on real-time tracking of hand and arm movements and providing and providing touch feedback via dynamic skin strain using a wearable interface. This device has applications for motor rehabilitation after injury or disease, for athletics or for human-computer interaction.
  • Team Composition
    The ideal team size is 3-5 students with skills in mechanical engineering, electronics and software.
  • Funding
    Funding may be available. Interested groups should contact Yon Visell by email.
  • Contact
    Yon Visell, PhD
    Assistant Professor
    yon.visell@drexel.edu
    RE TOUCH Lab
    www.re-touch-lab.com